Ranked: The Best and Worst Pension Plans, by Country

The global population is aging—by 2050, one in six people will be over the age of 65.

As our aging population nears retirement and gets closer to cashing in their pensions, countries need to ensure their pension systems can withstand the extra strain.

This graphic uses data from the Melbourne Mercer Global Pension Index (MMGPI) to showcase which countries are best equipped to support their older citizens, and which ones aren’t.

The Breakdown

Each country’s pension system has been shaped by its own economic and historical context. This makes it difficult to draw precise comparisons between countries—yet there are certain universal elements that typically lead to adequate and stable support for older citizens.

MMGPI organized these universal elements into three sub-indexes:

  • Adequacy: The base-level of income, as well as the design of a region’s private pension system.
  • Sustainability: The state pension age, the level of advanced funding from government, and the level of government debt.
  • Integrity: Regulations and governance put in place to protect plan members.

These three measures were used to rank the pension system of 37 different countries, representing over 63% of the world’s population.

Here’s how each country ranked:

Country Overall Value Adequacy Sustainability Integrity
Argentina 39.5 43.1 31.9 44.4
Australia 75.3 70.3 73.5 85.7
Austria 53.9 68.2 22.9 74.4
Brazil 55.9 71.8 27.7 69.8
Canada 69.2 70 61.8 78.2
Chile 68.7 59.4 71.7 79.2
China 48.7 60.5 36.7 46.5
Colombia 58.4 61.4 46 70.8
Denmark 80.3 77.5 82 82.2
Finland 73.6 73.2 60.7 92.3
France 60.2 79.1 41 56.8
Germany 66.1 78.3 44.9 76.4
Hong Kong 61.9 54.5 54.5 86.9
India 45.8 39.9 44.9 56.3
Indonesia 52.2 46.7 47.6 67.5
Ireland 67.3 81.5 44.6 76.3
Italy 52.2 67.4 19 74.5
Japan 48.3 54.6 32.2 60.8
Korea 49.8 47.5 52.6 49.6
Malaysia 60.6 50.5 60.5 76.9
Mexico 45.3 37.5 57.1 41.3
Netherlands 81 78.5 78.3 88.9
New Zealand 70.1 70.9 61.5 80.7
Norway 71.2 71.6 56.8 90.6
Peru 58.5 60 52.4 64.7
Philippines 43.7 39 55.5 34.7
Poland 57.4 62.5 45.3 66
Saudi Arabia 57.1 59.6 50.5 62.2
Singapore 70.8 73.8 59.7 81.4
South Africa 52.6 42.3 46 78.4
Spain 54.7 70 26.9 69.1
Sweden 72.3 67.5 72 80.2
Switzerland 66.7 57.6 65.4 83
Thailand 39.4 35.8 38.8 46.1
Turkey 42.2 42.6 27.1 62.8
UK 64.4 60 55.3 84
U.S. 60.6 58.8 62.9 60.4

The Importance of Sustainability

While all three sub-indexes are important to consider when ranking a country’s pension system, sustainability is particularly significant in the modern context. This is because our global population is increasingly skewing older, meaning an influx of people will soon be cashing in their retirement funds. As a consequence, countries need to ensure their pension systems are sustainable over the long-term.

There are several factors that affect a pension system’s sustainability, including a region’s private pension system, the state pension age, and the balance between workers and retirees.

The country with the most sustainable pension system is Denmark. Not only does the country have a strong basic pension plan—it also has a mandatory occupational scheme, which means employers are obligated by law to provide pension plans for their employees.

Adequacy versus Sustainability

Several countries scored high on adequacy but ranked low when it came to sustainability. Here’s a comparison of both measures, and how each country scored:

Ireland took first place for adequacy, but scored relatively low on the sustainability front at 27th place. This can be partly explained by Ireland’s low level of occupational coverage. The country also has a rapidly aging population, which skews the ratio of workers to retirees. By 2050, Ireland’s worker to retiree ratio is estimated to go from 5:1 to 2:1.

Similar to Ireland, Spain ranks high in adequacy but places extremely low in sustainability.

There are several possible explanations for this—while occupational pension schemes exist, they are optional and participation is low. Spain also has a low fertility rate, which means their worker-to-retiree ratio is expected to decrease.

Steps Towards a Better System

All countries have room for improvement—even the highest-ranking ones. Some general recommendations from MMGPI on how to build a better pension system include:

  • Increasing the age of retirement: Helps maintain a more balanced worker-to-retiree ratio.
  • Enforcing mandatory occupational schemes: Makes employers obligated to provide pension plans for their employees.
  • Limiting access to benefits: Prevents people from dipping into their savings preemptively, thus preserving funds until retirement.
  • Establishing strong pension assets to fund future liabilities: Ideally, these assets are more than 100% of a country’s GDP.
  • Pension systems across the globe are under an increasing amount of pressure. It’s time for countries to take a hard look at their pension systems to make sure they’re ready to support their aging population.

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